Interpretive Planning Meets Design

06-karl-lagerfeld-exhibitionInterpretive planning is used in museums, science centers and cultural centers today. “It is a a decision making process that blends management needs and resource considerations with visitor needs and desires to communicate a message to a targeted audience.”according to Wikipedia.

By extension “interpretive design” is a powerful cornerstone for branding.

Let’s take technology and museums. In technology, IBM’s Watson was, and is, being utilized to humanize technology for brands in the financial, automotive and pharma industry, among others… And the original IBM Watson Jeopardy campaign was a huge consumer and awards success.

At the Pitti Palace in Florence, Italy, a recent exhibit combined Karl Lagerfeld’s lifestyle portraits (‘Karl Lagerfeld’s Visions of Fashion’ pictured above) with rooms of classic art masterpieces. The outcome, an exhibit with a riveting interpretive design experience. I experienced it myself.

Interpretive design… a line of thinking, planning and actions to power the future of branding.

Canopy can help you build and maintain a custom interpretive design plan for your brand. One that impacts the various mediums utilized in your marketing campaign. Contact Marc Sampogna at marc@canopybrandgroup.com or 646 767 6576. 

Photo credit: Proj3ct Studio

Don’t Rain On My (Mobile) Parade

phonebrella

Nature vs. technology– this eternal struggle is best exemplified in the image of a city dweller trying to text under a barely-stable umbrella. Let’s face it, umbrellas were not designed to protect us from rain and allow us to text our friends. And after last weekend’s Hurricane Joaquin touched New York City, there’s never been a bigger need for an umbrella re-design. Enter Korean firm KT Design’s latest idea, the Phone-brella.

The Phone-brella is an umbrella designed to hook around the user’s arm, instead of having to grip it. The Phone-brella, aided by counterweights at its base, can then rest comfortably on the user’s shoulder as he or she texts. This simple design fix allows the owner to use his or her smartphone in a rainstorm.

Even though the Phone-brella can only be ordered from a Korean website right now, we’re hopeful that this smart design idea will make it’s way to the U.S., especially after winning the prestigious Red Dot Design award. Check out the video below to see the Phone-brella in action.

What Sparks Our Fire: Creative design giving technology a leg up on mother nature.

Algae Has a New Look

bloom

Algae may not be the sexiest organism, but it may be one of the most useful ones. While it is already being used as artful home decor, a company called Bloom Foam may have found another use for it: the flexible foam used to make yoga mats, sneakers, and even bath toys.

The product was conceived by Algix, an algae biomass harvesting company, and Effekt, a product and material design and development firm. Algix collects algae from fish farms, lakes, and wastewater facilities and processes it into foam

 

The advantages of using algae-based foam are numerous. They lower the carbon footprint by using natural ingredients, and also make use of algae found in waste streams, which can be bad for wildlife.

Additionally, because of its anti-microbial properties, algae has the potential to replace silver compounds (which can often harm human and environmental health) in anti-odor products, which could be useful in yoga mats and sneakers.

What Sparks Our Fire: Finding sustainable ways to breathe new life into old products.

Fast Food’s “Secret Sauce”

Fast food restaurants like Popeye’s and Chik-Fil-A have encountered an ongoing struggle to stay current and “in-touch” with millennials, facing adversaries like the increasing appeal of “clean eating” culture and “fast-casual” dining like Chipotle that allows customers to customize their meals. But now, they’ve found an unlikely answer: the sauce.

As it turns out, millennials like to have options when dining out, and providing a variety of sauce can appeal to even the most particular eaters. Earlier this year, KFC introduced its new Finger Lickin’ Good sauce, made with the same herbs and spices in its secret-recipe chicken, and as a result, sales are up by 15% since its release.

Similarly, chains like Pizza Hut and Buffalo Wild Wings have also planned to launch new sauces to complement their food, with the belief that “food shouldn’t be bland” in mind. Not only is it cost-effective (it’s less-expensive than creating new food items), but it also doesn’t slow down prep time or kitchen work.

What Sparks Our Fire: Food brands finding creative new ways to spice up their menus